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March 23 Seminar in Oakland to Focus on Using Graywater and Stormwater to Enhance Local Water Supplies

Event to be Simultaneously Webcast

March 17, 2016
The State Water Resources Control Board is co-sponsoring a seminar on Wednesday, March 23 on the recent report from the National Academy of Sciences, Using Graywater and Stormwater to Enhance Local Water Supplies: An Assessment of Risks, Costs, and Benefits.
 
The report’s committee chair, Dr. Richard Luthy, will be presenting an overview. The report examines the potential for non-potable use of graywater and stormwater, focusing on the technical, economic, regulatory, and social issues surrounding the use of these untapped resources.
 
Event Details
 
Wednesday, March 23, 12:00-1:30 p.m.
Oakland City Hall, Hearing Room 1
1 Frank H Ogawa Plaza, Oakland, CA
Live webcast
 
Report Background
 
From the report description on the National Academies Press website:
 
“Despite the benefits of using local alternative water sources to address water demands, many questions remain that have limited the broader application of graywater and stormwater capture and use. In particular, limited information is available on the costs, benefits, and risks of these projects, and beyond the simplest applications many state and local public health agencies have not developed regulatory frameworks for full use of these local water resources.
 
To address these issues, Using Graywater and Stormwater to Enhance Local Water Supplies analyzes the risks, costs, and benefits on various uses of graywater and stormwater. This report examines technical, economic, regulatory, and social issues associated with graywater and stormwater capture for a range of uses, including non-potable urban uses, irrigation, and groundwater recharge. Using Graywater and Stormwater to Enhance Local Water Supplies considers the quality and suitability of water for reuse, treatment and storage technologies, and human health and environmental risks of water reuse. The findings and recommendations of this report will be valuable for water managers, citizens of states under a current drought, and local and state health and environmental agencies.”


 
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