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November 2014 Midterm Election Wrap-Up

November 6, 2014
As the ballot dust settles from Tuesday’s election, the mixed bag of results delivered by voters at both the state and national level made for some surprising shake-ups that not even the most seasoned political insider anticipated.
 
Democrats once again swept the state’s highest constitutional offices with Gov. Jerry Brown leading the pack and garnering his fourth and final term with nearly 60 percent of the vote. While Democrats enjoyed victories at the statewide level, legislative Democrats were unable to retain their prized supermajority with Republicans capturing critical seats. With the last votes still to be tallied, Democrats appear three votes shy of the required supermajority thresholds in both the Assembly, which requires 54 votes, and the Senate, which requires 27 votes.
 
Voters also approved a trio of ballot measures authorizing $7.1 billion in bond funding for water infrastructure upgrades (Proposition 1); implementing changes to how the state manages its finances in preparation for the next economic downturn (Prop. 2); and reducing certain felony offenses to simple misdemeanors in hopes of easing prison overcrowding and reducing the number of specified nonviolent offender arrested and incarcerated (Prop. 47). Soundly rejected, however, Prop. 46, which would have cost local government millions by increasing the current cap on medical malpractice damages. Another healthcare related measure, Prop. 45, would have granted the Insurance Commissioner enhanced power to reject/approve healthcare insurance rates was denied by voters.
 
On the national level, Republicans seized control of the Senate, securing at least 52 seats with races in Virginia, Alaska and Louisiana still undecided. The GOP added to its majority in the House, picking up 14 Democratic seats while losing just one. With 17 races outstanding on election night, Republicans held 243 seats and will enjoy their largest majority since 1928. Republicans will now also count at least 31 governors among their ranks — success which may be particularly important for the party’s agenda with the potential for federal gridlock.
 
Although some races remain too close to call and may not be final for days, Republicans, both in California and on the national front, gained political ground. The key question now pending in Sacramento and Washington is how will each party embrace their newly defined roles in the coming legislative session?
 
Election System Changes Impact Supermajority; Prompt Intra-Party Challenges
 
Leading up to Tuesday’s elections, Democrats remained hopeful they would win enough seats to recapture the supermajority. However, unanticipated upsets resulted in Democrats turning over four Assembly seats and one Senate seat to Republicans. Absent any developments resulting in vacant Assembly seats, it seems rather unlikely that Democrats will recapture the supermajority in the lower house. Senate Democrats could potentially take back the supermajority should they secure three of the four vacant seats created by Senators Mark DeSaulnier (D-Concord), Mimi Walters (R-Laguna Niguel) and Steve Knight (R-Lancaster) ascension to Congress and the resignation of Senator Rod Wright (D-Ingelwood). Governor Brown has called a special election for Dec. 9 to fill the seat left vacant by Sen. Rod Wright and is expected to call three more in the next few weeks.
  
Whatever the final outcome, this election cycle completes the transition to sweeping changes made to California’s political system over the last few years — primarily the adoption of new district lines and new primary election rules providing for the top two vote-getters, regardless of party, to advance to the general election. The potential to gain the supermajority threshold in either house may largely be attributed to these changes. In particular, the top two system contributed to some of the nastiest and most expensive intra-party battles across the state and could possibly result in one incumbent losing to an opponent of the same party. 
   
Republican Control Alters Congressional Agenda
 
With Republicans poised to take control of Congress in the next session a number of important items still remain on this “lame duck” Congress’ December to-do list. The continuing budget resolution is due to expire, affecting some 60 tax provisions, the Terrorism Risk Insurance Act and the National Defense Reauthorization Act. Other pending proposals where action is possible include Internet taxation, collecting use tax through the Marketplace Fairness Act and foreign policy issues such as combatting the expansion of the Islamic State.
 
Among other challenges, the 114th Congress is facing  another debt ceiling deadline in March and the expiration of the Highway Trust Fund in May. Debate is also expected over immigration, energy (including the Keystone XL pipeline and energy exploration), the Affordable Care Act, environmental regulations, trade and tax reform in the months ahead.
 
How these changes in Washington’s political atmosphere will impact state and local governments remains to be seen. The League will continue to monitor the last remaining months of the current Congress and report back to members on any relevant developments. More information regarding the League’s federal priorities and issues is available online.   
 
Election Breakdown
 
The following is a list reflecting the outcomes of all six ballot measures, 80 Assembly district races, 20-even numbered district races, eight statewide constitutional office races, four Board of Equalization races and a selection of Congressional races.
 
Statewide Ballot Propositions
 
Proposition 1: Water Bond. Funding for Water Quality, Supply, Treatment, and Storage Projects.
League Position: Support
Status: PASS
Yes: 66.8 percent (3,378,826 votes)
No: 33.2 percent (1,681,733 votes)
 
The Water Quality, Supply, and Infrastructure Improvement Act of 2014 authorizes $7.12 billion in new general obligation bonds and the reallocation of $425 million in existing bond funds previously approved by voters for water related projects that will benefit local communities such as water conservation, groundwater recharge, stormwater capture, and reuse, watershed restoration, water storage and conveyance and water recycling and reuse.
 
Proposition 2: State Budget. Budget Stabilization Account.
League Position: Support
Status: PASS
Yes: 68.7 percent (3,421,992 votes)
No: 31.3 percent (1,557,990 votes)
 
The Rainy Day Budget Stabilization Fund Act requires the State Controller deposit 1.5 percent of general fund (GF) revenues and tax revenues derived from capital gains (to the extent that these revenues are in excess of 8.0 percent of GF revenues) into the Budget Stabilization Account (BSA) and lead to a reserve of 10 percent of GF revenues; any additional contributions above a 10 percent reserve is required to be spent on infrastructure. Prop 2 only allows budget reserve withdrawals or deposit suspension following a gubernatorial finding of a defined “budget emergency.” The measure also provides for the dedication of additional funds to pay previously accrued state debts, payments owed on local mandates, and supplemental payments toward the state’s pension liabilities that will contribute to the improvement of the state’s overall financial footing.                                                
 
Proposition 45: Healthcare Insurance. Rate Changes.
League Position: No Position 
Status: FAIL
Yes: 40.2 percent (2,032,272 votes)
No: 59.8 percent (3,024,584 votes)
 
The Insurance Rate Public Justification and Accountability Act would have required rate changes to individual and small-group health insurance plans be justified by the health insurer and submitted to the Insurance Commissioner for approval prior to taking effect. The measure also would prohibit health, auto and home insurance companies from using a person’s credit or prior insurance coverage history to determine eligibility or rates.                         
 
Proposition 46: Drug and Alcohol Testing of Doctors. Medical Negligence Lawsuits.
League Position: Oppose
Status: FAIL
Yes: 32.9 percent (1,671, 163 votes)
No: 67.1 percent (3,415,996 votes)
 
The Tory and Alana Pack Patient Safety Act of 2014 would have required increased the current $250,000 cap on noneconomic medical malpractice damages (such as pain and suffering, emotional distress) to an estimated $1.1 million. In addition, the measure required physicians to report suspected drug or alcohol impairment  of other physicians; requires hospitals to conduct alcohol and drug testing of physicians; and, requires health care practitioners and pharmacists to consult the Controlled Substance Utilization and Review Evaluation System (CURES) before prescribing or dispensing certain controlled substance that have a high potential for addiction/abuse (such as the opiates hydrocodone and morphine or stimulants like Adderall and Ritalin).                                        
 
Proposition 47: Criminal Sentences. Misdemeanor Penalties.
League Position: Oppose
Status: PASS
Yes: 58.5 percent (2,955,206 votes)
No: 41.5 percent (2,100,278 votes)
 
The Safe Neighborhoods and Schools Act re-classifies a host of felony offenses or felony/misdemeanor (“wobbler”) offenses as simple misdemeanors and directs any resulting state savings to support mental health and substance abuse treatment (65 percent), truancy and drop-out prevention (25 percent), and victim services (10 percent). 
 
Under Prop 47, felony crimes such as property crimes involving shoplifting, theft, forgery or fraud are reduced to misdemeanor offenses so long as the value of the property stolen/defrauded does not exceed $950.00.  The measure reduces possession of specific narcotics (e.g. including drugs used to facilitate date-rape, and concentrated cannabis), from a felony to a misdemeanor, and imposes new fines and shorter sentences.  The measure also authorizes the re-sentencing of individuals convicted of specified crimes, unless the defendant has prior convictions for certain violent or serious crimes Individuals eligible for resentencing consideration would be subject to a criminal history and risk assessment review prior to resentencing   
                                               
Proposition 48: Indian Gaming Compacts. (Referendum)
League Position: No Position
Status: FAIL
Yes: 39.1 percent (1,929,202 votes)
No: 60.9 percent (3,009,380 votes)
 
Repeals current law prescribed by AB 277 (Hall, Chapter 51, Statues of 2013) ratifying separate tribal-state gaming compacts entered into between the state of California and North Fork  Rancheria Band of Mono Indians and the Wiyot Tribe. The measure would also repeal the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) exemptions extended to both tribes under the bill authorizing the building of these off-site reservation casino establishments.
 
Statewide Assembly Race Results
 
Note: Candidates with an asterisk (*) are incumbents. NPP is abbreviated for No Party Preference.
 
AD 1 (Incumbent challenged; safe Republican district)
Brian Dahle* (R) vs. Brigham Sawyer Smith (D)
  • **Dahle defeated Brigham Sawyer Smith by a margin of 71.3 percent to 28.7 percent (or 44,082 votes)
AD 2 (Open seat; safe Democrat district) — New Member
Matt Heath (R) vs. Jim Wood (D)
  • **Wood defeated Heath by a margin of 63.8 percent to 36.2 percent (or 25,985 votes)
AD 3 (Open seat; safe Republican district) — New Member
James Gallagher (R) vs. Jim Reed (D)
  • **Gallagher defeated Reed by a margin of 63.1 percent to 36.9 percent (or 20,851 votes)
AD 4 (Open seat; safe Democrat district) — New Member
Charlie Schaupp (R) vs. Bill Dodd (D)
  • **Dodd defeated Schaupp by a margin of 60.9 percent to 39.1 percent (or 16,819 votes)
AD 5 (Incumbent challenged; safe Republican district)
Frank Bigelow* (R) vs. Patrick Hogan (L)
  • **Bigelow defeated Hogan by a margin of 74.5 percent to 25.5 percent (or 46,092 votes)
AD 6 (Incumbent challenged; safe Republican district)
Beth Gaines* (R) vs. Brian Caples (D)
  • **Gaines defeated Caples by a margin of 65.7 percent to 34.3 percent (or 29,725 votes)
AD 7 (Open seat; safe Democrat district; same party challenge) — New Member
Steve Cohn (D) vs. Kevin McCarty (D)
  • **McCarty defeated Cohn by a margin of 58.3 percent to 41.7 percent (or 8,136 votes)
AD 8 (Incumbent challenged; likely Democrat district)
Doug Haaland (R) vs. Ken Cooley* (D)
  • **Cooley defeated Haaland by a margin of 54.7 percent to 45.3 percent (or 6,238 votes)
AD 9 (Open seat; safe Democrat district; same party challenge) — New Member
Jim Cooper (D) vs. Darrell Fong (D)
  • **Cooper defeated Fong by a margin of 56.1 percent to 43.9 percent (or 6,595 votes)
AD 10 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district)
Gregory Allen (R) vs. Marc Levine* (D)
  • **Levine defeated Allen by a margin of 73.3 percent to 26.7 percent (or 47,173 votes)
AD 11 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district)
Alex Henthorn (R) vs. Jim Frazier* (D)
  • **Frazier defeated Henthorn by a margin of 58.6 percent to 41.4 percent (or 10,833 votes)
AD 12 (Incumbent challenged; safe Republican district)
Kristin Olsen* (R) vs. Harinder Grewal (D)
  • **Olsen defeated Grewal by a margin of 67.3 percent to 32.7 percent (or 21,893 votes)
AD 13 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district)
Sol Jobrack (R) vs. Susan Eggman* (D)
  • **Eggman defeated Jobrack by a margin of 60 percent to 40 percent (or 8,727 votes)
AD 14 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district)
Joy Delepine (R) vs. Susan Bonilla* (D)
  • **Bonilla defeated Delepine by a margin of 68.2 percent to 31.8 percent (or 24,375 votes)
AD 15 (Open seat; safe Democrat district; same party challenge) — New Member
Elizabeth Echols (D) vs. Tony Thurmond (D)
  • **Thurmond defeated Echols by a margin of 54.3 percent to 45.7 percent (or 6,265 votes)
AD 16 (Open seat; likely Democrat district) — Party Change/ New Member
Catharine Baker (R) vs. Tim Sbranti (D)
  • **Baker defeated Sbranti by a margin of 51.9 percent to 48.1 percent (or 3,349 votes)
AD 17 (Open seat; safe Democrat district; same party challenge) — New Member
David Campos (D) vs. David Chiu (D)
  • **Chiu defeated Campos by a margin of 51.4 percent to 48.6 percent (or 2,397 votes)
AD 18 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district)
David Erlich (R) vs. Rob Bonta* (D)
  • **Bonta defeated Erlich by a margin of 85.4 percent to 14.6 percent (or 43,794 votes)
AD 19 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district)
Rene Pineda (R) vs. Phil Ting* (D)
  • **Ting defeated Pineda by a margin of 75.9 percent to 24.1 percent (or 38,672 votes)
AD 20 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district)
Jamie Patino (R) vs. Bill Quirk* (D)
  • **Quirk defeated Patino by a margin of 70.9 percent to 29.1 percent (or 21,250 votes)
AD 21 (Incumbent challenged; likely Democrat district)
Jack Mobley (R) vs. Adam Gray* (D)
  • **Gray defeated Mobley by a margin of 52.4 percent to 47.6 percent (or 2,313 votes)
AD 22 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district)
Mark Gilham (R) vs. Kevin Mullin* (D)
  • **Mullin defeated Gilham by a margin of 69.4 percent to 30.6 percent (or 28,211 votes)
AD 23 (No challenger; safe Republican district)
Jim Patterson* (R)
  • **Patterson easily won with 61,744 votes
AD 24 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district)
Diane Gabl (R) vs. Richard Gordon* (D)
  • **Gordon defeated Gabl by a margin of 68.4 percent to 31.6 percent (or 24,406 votes)
AD 25 (Open seat; safe Democrat district) — New Member
Bob Brunton (R) vs. Kansen Chu (D)
  • **Chu defeated Brunton by a margin of 68.4 percent to 31.6 percent (or 18,368 votes)
AD 26 (Open seat; safe Republican district; same party challenge) — New Member
Devin Mathis (R) vs. Rudy Mendoza (R)
  • **Mathis defeated Mendoza by a margin of 55.6 percent to 44.4 percent (or 4,828 votes)
AD 27 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district)
Burt Lancaster (R) vs. Nora Campos* (D)
  • **Campos defeated Lancaster by a margin of 67.9 percent to 32.1 percent (or 15,473 votes)
AD 28 (Open seat; safe Democrat district) – New Member
Chuck Page (R) vs. Evan Low (D)
  • **Low defeated Page by a margin of 58.2 percent to 41.8 percent (or 11,997 votes)
AD 29 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district)
Palmer Kain (R) vs. Mark Stone* (D)
  • **Stone defeated Kain by a margin of 68.7 percent to 31.3 percent (or 30,390 votes)
AD 30 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district)
Mark Starritt (R) vs. Luis Alejo* (D)
  • **Alejo defeated Starritt by a margin of 58.3 percent to 41.7 percent (or 6,812 votes)
AD 31 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district)
Walter Villarreal (NPP) vs. Henry Perea* (D)
  • **Perea defeated Villarreal by a margin of 65.9 percent to 34.1 percent (or 12,207 votes)
AD 32 (Incumbent challenged; likely Democrat district)
Pedro Rios (R) vs. Rudy Salas* (D)
  • **Salas defeated Rios by a margin of 53.1 percent to 46.9 percent (or 2,557 votes)
AD 33 (Open seat; safe Republican district) — New Member
Jay Obernolte (R) vs. John Coffey (D)
  • **Obernolte defeated Coffey by a margin of 66 percent to 34 percent (or 18,033 votes)
AD 34 (Incumbent challenged; safe Republican district)
Shannon Grove* (R) vs. Virginia “Mari” Goodman (D)
  • **Grove defeated Goodman by a margin of 74.6 percent to 25.4 percent (or 36,882 votes)
AD 35 (Incumbent challenged; likely Republican district)
Katcho Achadjian* (R) vs. Heidi Harmon (D)
  • **Achadjian defeated Harmon by a margin of 62.7 percent to 37.3 percent (or 23,110 votes)
AD 36 (Incumbent challenged; competitive district) — Party Change/New Member
Tom Lackey (R) vs. Steve Fox* (D)
  • **Lackey defeated incumbent Fox by a margin of 61.5 percent to 38.5 percent (or 12,370 votes)
AD 37 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district)
Ron DeBlauw (R) vs. Das Williams* (D)
  • **Williams defeated DeBlauw by a margin of 57.6 percent to 42.1 percent (or 14,468 votes)
AD 38 (Incumbent challenged; safe Republican district)
Scott Wilk* (R) vs. Jorge Fuentes (D)
  • **Wilk defeated Fuentes by a margin of 66.5 percent to 33.5 percent (or 24,163 votes)
AD 39 (Incumbent challenged; safe/competitive Democrat district) — Close Contest/Potential New Member
Raul Bocanegra* (D) vs. Patty Lopez (D)
  • **Lopez is currently leading over incumbent Bocanegra by a margin of 50.3 percent to 49.7 percent (or 182 votes)
AD 40 (Open seat; likely Republican district) — New Member
Marc Steinorth (R) vs. Kathleen Henry (D)
  • **Steinorth defeated Henry by a margin of 56.4 percent to 43.6 percent (or 7,177 votes)
AD 41 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district)
Nathaniel Tsai (R) vs. Chris Holden* (D)
  • **Holden defeated Tsai by a margin of 59 percent to 41 percent (or 14,681 votes)
AD 42 (Open seat; safe Republican district) — New Member
Chad Meyes (R) vs. Karalee Hargrove (D)
  • **Mayes defeated Hargrove by a margin of 57.6 percent to 42.4 percent (or 11,959 votes)
AD 43 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district)
Todd Royal (R) vs. Mike Gatto* (D)
  • **Gatto defeated Royal by a margin of 65.8 percent to 34.2 percent (or 19,284 votes)
AD 44 (Open seat; competitive district) — New Member
Rob McCoy (R) vs. Jacqui Irwin (D)
  • **Irwin defeated McCoy by a margin of 51.1 percent to 48.9 percent (or 1,856 votes)
AD 45 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district)
Susan Shelley (R) vs. Matt Dababneh* (D)
  • **Dababneh defeated Shelley by a margin of 56.1 percent to 43.9 percent (or 7,351 votes)
AD 46 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district)
Zachary Taylor (R) vs. Adrin Nazarian* (D)
  • **Nazarian defeated Taylor by a margin of 71.1 percent to 28.9 percent (or 20,405 votes)
AD 47 (Incumbent challenged; safe/competitive Democrat district)
Cheryl Brown* (D) vs. Gil Navarro (D)
  • **Brown defeated Navarro by a margin of 57.1 percent to 42.9 percent (or 4,650 votes)
AD 48 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district)
Joe Gardner (R) vs. Roger Hernandez* (D)
  • **Hernandez defeated Gardner by a margin of 54 percent to 46 percent (or 3,596 votes)
AD 49 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district)
Esthela Torres Siegrist (R) vs. Ed Chau* (D)
  • **Chau defeated Siegrist by a margin of 60.8 percent to 39.2 percent (or 8,964 votes)
AD 50 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district)
Bradly Torgan (R) vs. Richard Bloom* (D)
  • **Bloom defeated Torgan by a margin of 71.2 percent to 28.8 percent (or 34,395 votes)
AD 51 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district)
Stephen Smith (R) vs. Jimmy Gomez* (D)
  • **Gomez defeated Smith by a margin of 83.7 percent to 16.3 percent (or 26,016 votes)
AD 52 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district)
Dorothy Pineda (R) vs. Freddie Rodriguez* (D)
  • **Rodriguez defeated Pineda by a margin of 59 percent to 41 percent (or 6,578 votes)
AD 53 (Open seat; safe/competitive Democrat district) — New Member
Miguel Santiago (D) vs. Sandra Mendoza (D)
  • **Santiago defeated Mendoza by a margin of 64.2 percent to 35.8 percent (or 6,920 votes)
AD 54 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district)
Glen Ratcliff (R) vs. Sebastian mark Ridley Thomas* (D)
  • **Ridley Thomas defeated Ratcliff by a margin of 78.3 percent to 21.7 percent (or 34,826 votes)
AD 55 (Open seat; safe Republican district) —New Member
Ling-Ling Chang (R) vs. Gregg Fritchle (D)
  • **Chang defeated Fritchle by a margin of 63.4 percent to 36.6 percent (or 17,315 votes)
AD 56 (Open seat; safe Democrat district) — New Member
Charles Bennett Jr. (R) vs. Eduardo Garcia (D)
  • **Garcia defeated Bennett Jr. by a margin of 56.8 percent to 43.2 percent (or 5,764 votes)
AD 57 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district; somewhat competitive)
Rite Topalian (R) vs. Ian Calderon* (D)
  • **Calderon defeated Topalian by a margin of 51.4 percent to 48.6 percent (or 1,383 votes)
AD 58 (No challenger; safe Democratic district)
Cristina Garcia* (D)
  • **Garcia easily won with 34,138 votes
AD 59 (No challenger; safe Democratic district)
Reggie Jones-Sawyer* (D)
  • **Jones-Sawyer easily won with 21,769 votes
AD 60 (Incumbent challenged; safe Republican district)
Eric Linder* (R) vs. Ken Park (D)
  • **Linder defeated Park by a margin of 61.7 percent to 38.3 percent (or 9,624 votes)
AD 61 (Incumbent challenged; likely Democrat district)
Rudy Aranda (R) vs. Jose Medina* (D)
  • **Medina defeated Aranda by a margin of 56.9 percent to 43.1 percent (or 5,696 votes)
AD 62 (Open seat; safe Democrat district) — New Member
Ted Grose (R) vs. Autumn Burke (D)
  • **Burke defeated Grose by a margin of 75.7 percent to 24.3 percent (or 28,448 votes)
AD 63 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district)
Adam Miller (R) vs. Anthony Rendon* (D)
  • **Rendon defeated Miller by a margin of 68.8 percent to 31.2 percent (or 12,013 votes)
AD 64 (Open seat; safe/competitive Democrat district) — New Member
Mike Gipson (D) vs. Prophet Walker (D)
  • **Gipson defeated Walker by a margin of 64.1 percent to 35.9 percent (or 10,582 votes)
AD 65 (Incumbent challenged; competitive district) — Party Change/New Member
Young Kim (R) vs. Sharon Quirk-Silva* (D)
  • **Kim defeated incumbent Quirk-Silva by a margin of 56 percent to 44 percent (or 6,822 votes)
AD 66 (Incumbent challenged; competitive district) — Party Change/ New Member
David Hadley (R) vs. Al Muratsuchi* (D)
  • **Hadley defeated incumbent Muratsuchi by a margin of 51.4 percent to 48.6 percent (or 2,329 votes)
AD 67 (Incumbent challenged; safe Republican district)
Melissa Melendez* (R) vs. Conrad Melton (D)
  • **Melendez defeated Melton by a margin of 68.7 percent to 31.3 percent (or 21,802 votes)
AD 68 (Incumbent challenged; safe Republican district)
Donald Wagner* (R) vs. Anne Cameron (D)
  • **Wagner defeated Cameron by a margin of 68.6 percent to 31.4 percent (or 26,414 votes)
AD 69 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district)
Sherry Walker (R) vs. Tom Daly* (D)
  • **Daly defeated Walker by a margin of 64.5 percent to 35.5 percent (or 8,859 votes)
AD 70 (Open seat; safe Democrat district) — New Member
John Goya (R) vs. Patrick O’Donnell (D)
  • **O’Donnell defeated Goya by a margin of 63 percent to 37 percent (or 14,420 votes)
AD 71 (Incumbent challenged; safe/competitive Republican district)
Brian Jones* (R) vs. Tony Teora (D)
  • **Jones defeated Teora by a margin of 71.4 percent to 28.6 percent (or 29,231 votes)
AD 72 (Incumbent challenged; safe Republican district)
Travis Allen* (R) vs. Joel Block (D)
  • **Allen defeated Block by a margin of 65.9 percent to 34.1 percent (or 24,302 votes)
AD 73 (Open seat; safe Republican district) — New Member
William Brough (R) vs. Wendy Gabriella (D)
  • **Brough defeated Gabriella by a margin of 68 percent to 32 percent (or 30,506 votes)
AD 74 (Open seat; safe/competitive Republican district) — New Member
Matthew Harper (R) vs. Keith Curry (R)
  • **Harper defeated Curry by a margin of 59 percent to 41 percent (or 13,382 votes)
AD 75 (Incumbent challenged; safe Republican district)
Marie Waldron* (R) vs. Nicholas Shestople (D)
  • **Waldron defeated Shestople by a margin of 69.4 percent to 30.6 percent (or 27,547 votes)
AD 76 (Incumbent challenged; safe/competitive Republican district)
Rocky Chávez* (R) vs. Thomas Krouse (R)
  • ** Chávez defeated Krouse by a margin of 67.4 percent to 32.6 percent (or 22,785 votes)
AD 77 (/Incumbent challenged; safe Republican district)
Brian Maienschein* (R) vs. Ruben Hernandez (D)
  • **Maienschein defeated Hernandez by a margin of 66.8 percent to 33.2 percent (or 31,949 votes)
AD 78 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district)
Barbara Decker (R) vs. Toni Atkins* (D)
  • **Atkins defeated Decker by a margin of 60.2 percent to 39.8 percent (or 17,931 votes)
AD 79 (Incumbent challenged; safe/competitive Democrat district)
Shirley Weber* (D) vs. George Williams (D)
  • **Weber defeated Williams by a margin of 60.8 percent to 39.2 percent (or 12,599 votes)
AD 80 (No challenger; safe Democrat district)
Lorena Gonzalez* (D)
  • **Gonzalez easily won with 31, 512 votes
Assembly Breakdown
  • 51 Democrats, 29 Republicans
  • 26 new incoming members
    • Number could increase to 27 if Patty Lopez (D) defeats incumbent Assemblyman Raul Bocanegra (D) in AD 39
  • 1 race currently too close to call (AD 39)
  • Democrats lost four seats to Republican challengers; three unseated members were incumbents, one was termed out:
    • AD 16, Assemblywoman Joan Buchanan (D) termed out, won by Republican
    • AD 36, Assemblyman Steve Fox unseated by Republican challenger
    • AD65, Assemblywoman Sharon Quirk-Silva unseated by Republican challenger
    • AD66, Assemblyman Al Muratsuchi unseated by Republican challenger
Statewide Senate Race Results
 
Note:
  • Candidates with an asterisk (*) are incumbents.
  • Candidates with a triple asterisk (***) are incumbents whose districts have significantly shifted due to redistricting.
SD 2 (Open seat; safe Democrat district) — New Member
Lawrence Weisner (R) vs. Mike McGuire (D)
  • **McGuire defeated Weisner by a margin of 68.7 percent to 31.3 percent (or 71,585 votes)
SD 4 (Incumbent challenged; safe Republican district)
Jim Nielson* (R) vs. CJ Jawahar (D)
  • **Nielson defeated Jawahar by a margin of 64.5 percent to 35.5 percent (or 43,479 votes)
SD 6 (Open seat; safe/competitive Democrat district) — New Member
Roger Dickinson (D) vs. Richard Pan (D)
  • **Pan defeated Dickinson by a margin of 53.1 percent to 46.9 percent (or 6,641 votes)
SD 8 (Open seat; safe Republican district)
Tom Berryhill*** (R) vs. Paulina Miranda (D)
  • **Berryhill defeated Miranda by a margin of 66.8 percent to 33.2 percent (or 54,881 votes)
SD 10 (Open seat; safe Democrat district) — New Member
Peter Kuo (R) vs. Bob Wieckowski (D)
  • **Wieckowski defeated Kuo by a margin of 67.9 percent to 32.1 percent (or 36,518 votes)
SD 12 (Incumbent challenged; safe Republican district)
Anthony Canella* (R) vs. Shawn Bagley (D)
  • **Canella defeated Bagley by a margin of 62 percent to 38 percent (or 20,980 votes)
SD 14 (Open seat; likely Republican district)
Andy Vidak*** (R) vs. Luis Chavez (D)
  • **Vidak defeated Chavez by a margin of 55.5 percent to 44.5 percent (or 8,328 votes)
SD 16 (Incumbent challenged; safe Republican district)
Jean Fuller*** (R) vs. Ruth Musser-Lopez (D)
  • **Fuller defeated Musser-Lopez by a margin of 72.9 percent to 27.1 percent (or 59,904 votes)
SD 18 (Open seat; safe Democrat district) — New Member
Ricardo Antonio Benitez (R) vs. Bob Hertzberg (D)
  • **Hertzberg defeated Benitez by a margin of 69.9 percent to 30.1 percent (or 34,246 votes)
SD 20 (Open seat; safe Democrat district) — New Member
Matthew Munson (R) vs. Connie Leyva (D)
  • **Leyva defeated Munson by a margin of 62.2 percent to 37.8 percent (or 17,251 votes)
SD 22 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district)
Marc Rodriguez (R) vs. Ed Hernandez*** (D)
  • **Hernandez defeated Rodriguez by a margin of 64.4 percent to 35.6 percent (or 22,200 votes)
SD 24 (Incumbent challenged; safe/competitive Democrat district)
 Kevin De Leon*** (D) vs. Peter Choi (D)
  • **De Leon defeated Choi by a margin of 66.7 percent to 33.3 percent (or 22,111 votes)
SD 26 (Open seat; safe/competitive Democrat district) — New Member
Ben Allen (D) vs. Sandra Fluke (D)
  • **Allen defeated Fluke by a margin of 60.8 percent to 39.2 percent (or 32,764 votes)
SD 28 (Open seat; safe/competitive Republican district) — New Member
Jeff Stone (R) vs. Bonnie Garcia (R)
  • **Stone defeated Garcia by a margin of 53.5 percent to 46.5 percent (or 8,026 votes)
SD 30 (Incumbent challenged; safe/competitive Democrat district)
Holly Mitchell*** (D) vs. Isidro Armenta (D)
  • **Mitchell defeated Armenta by a margin of 68.7 percent to 31.3 percent (or 31,407 votes)
SD 32 (Open seat; likely Democrat district) — New Member
Mario Guerra (R) vs. Tony Mendoza (D)
  • **Mendoza defeated Guerra by a margin of 51.8 percent to 48.2 percent (or 3,702 votes)
SD 34 (Open seat; likely Republican district) — Party Change/New Member
Janet Nguyen (R) vs. Jose Solorio (D)
            **Nguyen defeated Solorio by a margin of 60 percent to 40 percent (or 23,599 votes)
 
SD 36 (Open seat; safe Republican district) — New Member
Patricia Bates (R) vs. Gary Kephart (D)
  • **Bates defeated Kephart by a margin of 66 percent to 34 percent (or 51,085 votes)
SD 38 (Incumbent challenged; safe Republican district)
Joel Anderson*** (R) vs. Fotios Tsimboukakis (D)
  • **Anderson defeated Tsimboukakis by a margin of 69.5 percent to 30.5 percent (or 61,311 votes)
SD 40 (Incumbent challenged; safe/competitive Democrat district)
Ben Hueso* (D) vs. Rafael Estrada (D)
  • **Hueso defeated Estrada by a margin of 55.1 percent to 44.9 percent (or 7,700 votes)
Senate Breakdown
  • 24 Democrats, 12 Republicans, 4 vacancies (SD 7, SD 21, SD 35, SD 37)
  • Vacancies due to:
    • SD 7: Sen. Mark DeSaulnier (D) was victorious in his CD 11 race and is now expected to resign from his current SD 7 post; he was to be termed out in 2016.
    • SD 21: Sen. Steve Knight (R) was victorious in his CD 25 race and is now expected to resign from his current SD 21 post; he was to be termed out in 2020.
    • SD 35: Following the resignation of former Sen. Rod Wright (D) Sept. 22, 2014, Gov. Jerry Brown quickly scheduled a special election to fill the vacancy for Dec. 9.
    • SD 37: Sen. Mimi Walters (R) was victorious in her CD 45 race and is now expected to resign from her current SD 37 post; she was to be termed out in 2016.
  • 10 new members
  • Democrats lost one seat to Republicans in SD 34. 
Statewide Constitutional Officer Results
 
Governor
Neel Kashkari (R) vs. Jerry Brown* (D)
  • **Brown defeated Kashkari by a margin of 58.7 percent to 41.3 percent (or 902,114 votes)
Lieutenant Governor
Ron Nehring (R) vs. Gavin Newsom* (D)
  • **Newsom defeated Nehring by a margin of 55.9 percent to 44.1 percent or (or 606,420 votes)
Secretary of State
Pete Peterson (R) vs. Alex Padilla (D)
  • **Padilla defeated Peterson by a margin of 52.5 percent to 47.5 percent (or 250,772 votes)
State Controller
Ashley Swearengin (R) vs. Betty Yee (D)
  • **Yee defeated Swearengin by a margin of 52.8 percent to 47.2 percent (or 276,435 votes)
State Treasurer
Greg Conlon (R) vs. John Chiang (D)
  • **Chiang defeated Conlon by a margin of 57.7 percent to 42.3 percent (or 774,500 votes)
Attorney General
Ronald Gold (R) vs. Kamala Harris* (D)
  • **Harris defeated Gold by a margin of 56.3 percent to 43.7 percent (or 636,066 votes)
Insurance Commissioner
Ted Gaines (R) vs. Dave Jones* (D)
  • **Jones defeated Gaines by a margin of 56.3 percent to 43.7 percent (or 630,855 votes)
Superintendent of Public Instruction (Non-Partisan Race)
Tom Torlakson* vs. Marshall Tuck
  • **Torlakson defeated Tuck by a margin of 52.1 percent to 47.9 percent (or 181,489 votes)
Board of Equalization (BOE) Race Results
 
Note: Candidates with a triple asterisk (***) are incumbents whose districts have significantly shifted due to redistricting.
 
BOE Member District 1 (Incumbent challenged; safe Republican district) — Party Change/New District
George Runner*** (R) vs. Chris Parker (D)
  • **Runner defeated Parker by a margin of 58.8 percent to 41.2 percent (or 212,976 votes)
BOE Member District 2 (Open seat; safe Democrat district) — Party Change/New District
James Theis (R) vs. Fiona Ma (D)
  • **Ma defeated Theis by a margin of 67.4 percent to 32.6 percent (or 487,146 votes)
BOE Member District 3 (Incumbent challenged; safe Democrat district) — Party Change/New District
Rick Marshall (R) vs. Jerome Horton*** (D)
  • **Horton defeated Marshall by a margin of 61.8 percent to 38.2 percent (or 245,986 votes)
BOE Member District 4 (Open seat; safe Republican district) — Party Change/New District
Diane Harkey (R) vs. Nader Shahatit (D)
  • **Harkey defeated Shahatit by a margin of 62 percent to 38 percent (or 300,310 votes)
U.S. House of Representatives Race Results
 
Note: Candidates with an asterisk (*) are incumbents. The following list contains races that are either too close to call or are open and will be filled with new members.
 
CD 7 (Incumbent challenged; competitive district) — Close Contest
Doug Ose (R) vs. Ami Bera* (D)
  • **Ose is currently leading over incumbent Bera by a margin of 51.4 percent to 48.6 percent (or 3,011 votes)
CD 9 (Incumbent challenged; likely Democrat district; competitive district) — Close Contest
Antonio “Tony” Amador (R) vs. Jerry McNerney* (D)
  • **McNerney is currently leading over Amador by a margin of 51.5 percent to 48.5 percent (or 2,397 votes)
CD 11 (Open seat; safe Democrat district) — New Member
Tue Phan (R) vs. Mark DeSaulnier (D)
  • **Desaulnier defeated Phan by a margin of 66.2 percent to 33.8 percent (or 34,671 votes)
CD 16 (Incumbent challenged; likely Democrat district; competitive district)
Johnny Tacherra (R) vs. Jim Costa* (D)
  • **Tacherra is currently leading over incumbent Costa by a margin of 50.5 percent to 49.5 percent (or 736 votes)
CD 25 (Open seat; safe/competitive Republican district) — New Member
Steve Knight (R) vs. Tony Strickland (R)
  • **Knight defeated Strickland by a margin of 53.5 percent to 46.5 percent (or 6,119 votes)
CD 26 (Incumbent challenged; competitive district) — Close Contest
Jeff Gorell (R) vs. Julia Brownley * (D)
  • **Brownley is currently leading over Gorell by a margin of 50.2 percent to 49.8 percent (or 530 votes)
CD 31 (Incumbent challenged; competitive district) — New Member/Close Contest
Pete Aguilar (R) vs. Paul Chabot (D)
  • **Aguila is currently leading over Chabot by a margin of 51 percent to 49 percent (or 1,635 votes)
CD 33 (Open seat; safe Democrat district) — New Member
Elan Carr (R) vs. Ted Lieu (D)
  • **Lieu defeated Carr by a margin of 58.4 percent to 41.6 percent (or 22,854 votes)
CD 35 (Open seat; safe/competitive Democratic district) — New Member
Norma Torres (D) vs. Christina Gagnier (D)
  • **Torres defeated Gagnier by a margin of 63.3 percent to 36.7 percent (or 12,872 votes)
CD 45 (Open seat; safe Republican district) — New Member
Mimi Walters (R) vs. Drew Leavens (D)
  • **Walters defeated Leavens by a margin of 65.4 percent to 34.6 percent (or 36,856 votes)
CD 52 (Incumbent challenged; competitive district) — Close Contest
Carl DeMaio (R) vs. Scott Peters* (D)
  • **DeMaio is currently leading over incumbent Peters by a margin of 50.3 percent to 49.7 percent (or 752 votes)


 
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