Home > News > News Articles > 2014 > April > GRANT OPPORTUNITIES: Cities Encouraged to Apply for DOJ and NHPRC Grant Opportunities
News Feed

GRANT OPPORTUNITIES: Cities Encouraged to Apply for DOJ and NHPRC Grant Opportunities

April 25, 2014
The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) and the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) are offering several grant opportunities of interest to cities and local governments.
 
The League strongly encourages cities review the opportunities listed below and apply for these beneficial funds.
 
DOJ Grants
 
Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP): Second Chance Act Two-Phase Juvenile Reentry Demonstration Program Planning and Implementation
The FY 2014 Second Chance Act Two-Phase Juvenile Reentry Demonstration Program will help ensure that the assessments and services youths receive in secure confinement, the re-entry planning process, and the services and supervision youths receive upon re-entry promote reduced recidivism rates and improvements in positive youth outcomes. A secure confinement facility may include a juvenile detention center, juvenile correctional facility or staff-secure facility. Eligible juveniles must have been confined under the custody of a local or state juvenile correctional agency and must be admitted to the program prior to their 18th birthday. However, award recipients may continue to implement a juvenile re-entry plan for these individuals beyond their 18th birthday. OJJDP does not have a set timeline for terminating these services; they can continue as long as is deemed therapeutically necessary. All applications for this program are due by June 2.
 
Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA): Swift and Certain Sanctions (SAC)/Replicating the Concepts Behind Project HOPE
There are multiple states, counties, cities and tribes that are interested in implementing SAC models of supervision with offenders in the community. This interest has grown out of the potential promise that these SAC models have shown in effectively reducing recidivism and preventing crime. In particular, Hawaii's Opportunity Probation with Enforcement (HOPE) Program has been shown to have promise, and as a result there is significant interest and activity in implementing models of supervision and other versions of the HOPE model that rely on swift and certain sanctions.
 
SAC approaches are intended to:
  • Improve supervision strategies that reduce recidivism;
  • Promote and increase collaboration among agencies and officials who work in community corrections and related fields;
  • Enhance the offenders' perception that the supervision decisions are fair, consistently applied and consequences are transparent; and
  • Improve the outcomes of individuals participating in these initiatives.
Through this FY 2014 grant announcement, BJA will select multiple applicants to implement or enhance a HOPE model using SAC. Applicants selected under this announcement will work with BJA and its SAC training and technical assistance partner to implement the model with fidelity. All applications for this program are due by June 3.
 
NHPRC Grants
 
Access to Historical Records
NHPRC seeks proposals that promote the preservation and use of the nation's most valuable archival resources. This grant program is designed to support archival repositories in preserving and processing primary source materials. The program emphasizes the creation of online tools that facilitate the public discovery of historical records. The commission looks to fund projects that undertake one or more of the following activities:
  • Preservation, arrangement and online description of historical records in all formats; and
  • Digital preservation of electronic records and unstable audio and visual formats.
After completing arrangement and description activities, applicants may also propose to digitize materials to provide online access to collections. All applications for this program are due by Aug. 27.
 
Literacy and Engagement with Historical Records
NHPRC seeks projects that explore ways to improve digital literacy and encourage citizen engagement with historical records. The Literacy and Engagement Grant Program offers support for projects that will result in archives reaching audiences through digital literacy programs and workshops, new tools and applications and citizen engagement in archival processes. NHPRC is looking to fund pilot projects in areas that:
  • Develop partnerships among archives, historical records repositories, educational and community-based institutions to provide educational opportunities for people — particularly students — to develop their digital literacy skills when they find, evaluate and use primary source documents online. In addition, projects may seek to increase individual understanding of technology operations and concepts so that they can engage in effective personal digital archiving or other types of digital archives curriculum development;
  • Create or develop new online tools and applications — including mobile apps — to enhance public understanding and access to historical records; and
  • Enlist “citizen archivists” in projects to accelerate digitization and online public access to historical records. This may include, but is not limited to, improving crowdsourcing efforts for identifying, tagging, transcribing, annotating or otherwise enhancing digitized historical records. 
All applications for this program are due by Dec. 4.
 
Publishing Historical Records in Documentary Editions
NHPRC seeks proposals to publish documentary editions of historical records. These editions publish historical records of national significance and may focus on the papers of major figures from American life or cover broad historical movements in politics, military, business, social reform, the arts and other aspects of the national experience. The historical value of the records and their expected usefulness to broad audiences must justify the costs of the project. The goal of this program is to provide access to and editorial context for the historical documents and records that tell the American story. NHPRC encourages projects — whenever possible and appropriate — to provide access to these materials in a free and open online environment, without precluding other forms of publication. Grants are awarded for collecting, describing, preserving, compiling, editing, and publishing documentary source materials in print and online. All applications for this program are due by Aug. 27.
 
Digital Dissemination of Archival Collections
NHPRC would like to make historical records of national significance to the United States broadly available by disseminating digital surrogates on the Internet. Projects may focus on the papers of major figures from American life or cover broad historical movements in politics, military, business, social reform, the arts and other aspects of the national experience. The historical value of the records and their expected usefulness to broad audiences must justify the costs of the project. The commission will not consider proposals that charge for access. Grants are awarded for digitizing documentary source materials. Applicants may digitize a single collection or set of collections for online dissemination. Such online editions should provide basic access to collections. In addition, applicants may apply for support to undertake more complex work — such as document transcription, tagging or geo-referencing — if these additional access points are justified by the value of the material and its expected users. All applications for this program are due by Dec. 4.


 
© League of California Cities