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Governor Brown Delivers State of State Address, Calls Again for “Subsidiarity”

January 24, 2013

This morning Gov. Jerry Brown delivered his 2013 State of the State address touching on a number of issues including education, health care, enterprise, trade missions to China, water, climate change, CEQA, transportation and high speed rail.

 

The Governor briefly thanked voters for passing Proposition 30, which raised state sales and personal income taxes for seven years and vowed to “guard jealously the money temporarily made available.”

During his speech, he also once again called for the principle of subsidiarity saying: “Subsidiarity is the idea that a central authority should only perform those tasks which cannot be performed at the more immediate or local level.” He also discussed this principle during a press conference following the release of his FY 2013-14 budget proposal.

The Governor’s budget proposal also includes reforms to the Enterprise Zone program through regulatory changes and he briefly noted his desire to reform the program and the Job Hiring Credit during his address. Gov. Brown also announced his plans to lead a trade and investment mission to China in April where he will also officially launch his new Go-Biz trade office in Shanghai.

Last September, the Governor signed legislation authorizing Go-Biz to reestablish California’s international trade office in China and other offices worldwide. Gov. Brown has said that he believes these actions will help strengthen California’s economy through trade and investment partnerships. For more, please see the Sept. 21 CA Cities Advocate story “Governor Appoints New Go-Biz Team, Signs Legislation to Reopen International Trade Offices.”

Since the Governor took office in January 2011, local governments have seen the dissolution of the state’s redevelopment agencies and attempts to eliminate or reform Enterprise Zones, the two main tools used by local agencies to promote economic development. It remains to be seen whether reopening trade offices will translate into local economic development.

Take Action on Enterprise Zones

The League has compiled a history on Enterprise Zones, as well as talking points, which include actions city officials can immediately take to communicate the importance of the Enterprise Zone program to legislators and the public.

Action steps city officials can take include:

  • Call or write your Assembly Member and Senator. Help legislators understand the importance of your community’s program. Tell your community’s success stories. Search legislator contact information online.
  • Write a letter to the editor. Share your success stories and highlight the importance of this program for the economic development of your community.
  • Join the California Association of Enterprise Zone’s coalition. Visit CAEZ’s website to join a coalition of local governments and business interests with the goal of protecting Enterprise Zones.
  • Adopt a Resolution Supporting Enterprise Zones. The League has posted a sample resolution on its website.


 
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